Halloween safety: What every parent needs to know

As a mom, I know how fun and exciting Halloween can be for children. But as a pediatrician, I also know how important it is for parents to be involved in helping older children stay safe while trick-or-treating.

In the following video, I share what I think parents should know before letting their kids go out trick-or-treating:

…Continue reading →

How research grants improve lives of kids with cancer and blood disorders

Hope on Wheels

Sam Milanovich, MD, and Julie Talano, MD, received grants from the Hyundai Hope on Wheels program.

In the past 40 years, there’s been a big improvement in the survival rate of kids with cancer and blood disorders, and that’s due to one thing: Research. Today two of our doctors, Sam Milanovich, MD, and Julie Talano, MD, received grants from the Hyundai Hope on Wheels program.

I was so proud to honor them, because I know it’s through research that we learn how to improve treatment and enhance quality of life for our patients. Watch highlights from today’s press conference: …Continue reading →

Why it’s important to customize the form and fit of a scoliosis brace

Many families are preparing for school and fall sports. As part of these preparations, you might be arranging physicals for your kids. During the exam, your child’s doctor may tell you he or she has signs of scoliosis.

I’m an orthotist, and for the last 17 years, I’ve worked with patients at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. An orthotist is a person who makes braces for most any part of the body, including back braces for kids with scoliosis. But I don’t do teeth, I leave that to the orthodontists!

Scoliosis usually is diagnosed when a child is between the ages of 10 and 15, and most …Continue reading →

How donated breast milk helps infants thrive at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

As an international board-certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) for almost 20 years, I have educated many mothers on the importance of breastfeeding for both baby and mother. For some, breastfeeding can be a complex road that takes many turns.

Many hospitals around the country, including Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, use pasteurized donor milk for infants whose mothers cannot provide breast milk. Like mother’s own milk, pasteurized donor milk provides nutrients, enzymes, growth factors …Continue reading →

Chandra Wilson, “Dr. Bailey” on ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy, provides tips for parents about misdiagnosed condition

Chandra Wilson recently visited Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin and the Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Program team. She is the national spokesperson for the Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association. She became involved with the organization after her teenage daughter was diagnosed with cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS).

There are only a few programs of this kind in the country, and the CVS Program at Children’s Hospital is the largest focused on children. Our interdisciplinary team of specialists provides family-centered care to patients and their families.

While Wilson was here, she shared advice for parents of children with CVS. Watch her …Continue reading →

Navigating the twists and turns: How we helped our daughter manage scoliosis

It was nearly three years ago, but I still remember the day. Our pediatrician’s nurse called to tell me that Mary, my oldest daughter, had scoliosis. I remember feeling scared and very emotional. I actually was in tears at one point. It was hard to imagine what the future might hold.

Fast forward to 2012, and I realize that call was the beginning of a rollercoaster ride. Now I really don’t like rollercoasters, but thanks to the specialists at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, the ride actually has been OK. As a family, we’ve learned to handle the ups …Continue reading →

My advice for kids living with scoliosis: Just be yourself

My name is Mary, and I have scoliosis. I was diagnosed with it a few years ago. I wear my brace during the day now, but I used to wear one at night. Wearing a brace has affected my life in many ways, but don’t worry. You can still be the same you even with scoliosis.

I’m 14 years old and a freshman at Hampshire High School, in Hampshire, Ill. Let me tell you a little about myself. I love to read, and I love cats. I have one cat named C.C., and she is the cutest thing ever!

During this past school year, I got a daytime brace. Don’t be afraid to tell your teachers and …Continue reading →

Why the right throwing skills are important for young athletes

Baseball is known as America’s pastime. There’s a small park close to my house, and sometimes I can hear people cheering during games. It’s great to hear them out there having fun.

I played baseball growing up too. When we’d get worn down, our coach might say things like, “No pain, no gain, or just tough it out!” Today young athletes are more serious about competition than ever before. As a pediatric sports medicine specialist, I often tell kids and …Continue reading →

Why one Kenosha girl is writing a letter to Michelle Obama on behalf of every child in Wisconsin

No one can tell the stories of children’s hospitals better than the patients and families that we serve. Every year, the Children’s Hospital Association hosts Family Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C.

This year, Claire Bevec, from Kenosha, Wis., is taking her story to Washington, D.C. She will join nearly 30 other child patients and their families from across the country to ask Congress to protect health care for children. National health care programs our kids rely …Continue reading →

For adults with congenital heart disease, Herma Heart Center is the best place for specialized care

Thanks to major advances in treating congenital heart disease, more than 90 percent of all children born with heart defects will survive to adulthood. This is a major success story in the medical world and has resulted in a new group of adults with congenital heart disease.

There are more than 1 million adults with congenital heart disease living in the U.S., of which about 15,000 live in Wisconsin. While many are doing well, these adults — regardless of their current condition — are at risk for unique health problems. For this …Continue reading →